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Guijianyu 5:1

Classical Name:
Burning Bush
Euonymus alatus
Euonymi Ramulus
鬼箭羽
Classification:
Herbs that Protect the Yang by Clearing Inflammation/Gu Toxicity (護陽)
Excipient:
Organic, soluble quinoa powder
Growing Location:
Sichuan Province, China (wild-crafted)
Traditional Preparation:
Unprocessed; naturally dried

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Guijianyu in its natural habitat, North Sichuan.Guijianyu is the traditional designation for the twigs of Euonymus alatus (Burning Bush), a name that literally translates as the “Winged Arrow that Kills Demons.” It represents one of the most important medicinals among a class of ancient “exorcism” herbs that feature the character for demon in their name. It is often found in clinical chapters listing treatments for Gu Syndrome (“Possession Caused by Parasitism”), malaria, venereal disease, toxic skin eruptions, or chronic body pain caused by recalcitrant pathogens. China’s earliest materia medica, the Shen Nong bencao jing, also called this herb Weimao (Spear of Protection) and characterized it as a bitter, cold, and non-toxic substance. The classic further described Guijianyu as a medicinal that can purge blood stasis caused by external injuries and menstrual stagnation. Modern research adds an anti-tumor effect and the lowering of blood sugar to the list of therapeutic functions.

Although ancient texts value Guijianyu for its anti-toxin effect, the herb appears to have become one of the casualties of the modern process of Chinese medicine standardization, in which all references to the profession’s shamanic past have been systematically purged from the face of TCM by the Chinese government. In addition, the plant grows only in the wild and is therefore extremely hard to find on Chinese herb markets.

The modern resurgence of deep seated recalcitrant infections affecting the nervous system, such as Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and other mystery syndromes has sent researchers into the rain forests of the world in search for potential cures. The renaissance of this herb is the result of a decade-long research project that first identified a range of “anti-Gu” substances in the classic materia medica, and then determined through clinical usage which one of these are appropriate and safe to use in a modern clinical context. In this process, Guijianyu was identified as one of the best broad-spectrum anti-toxin herbs with an anti-pathogenic function that can be compared to Qinghao.

Guijianyu being harvested by local wild-crafters in North Sichuan.Guijianyu is the traditional designation for the twigs of Euonymus alatus (Burning Bush), a name that literally translates as the “Winged Arrow that Kills Demons.” It represents one of the most important medicinals among a class of ancient “exorcism” herbs that feature the character for demon in their name. It is often found in clinical chapters listing treatments for Gu Syndrome (“Possession Caused by Parasitism”), malaria, venereal disease, toxic skin eruptions, or chronic body pain caused by recalcitrant pathogens. China’s earliest materia medica, the Shen Nong bencao jing, also called this herb Weimao (Spear of Protection) and characterized it as a bitter, cold, and non-toxic substance. The classic further described Guijianyu as a medicinal that can purge blood stasis caused by external injuries and menstrual stagnation. Modern research adds an anti-tumor effect and the lowering of blood sugar to the list of therapeutic functions.

Although ancient texts value Guijianyu for its anti-toxin effect, the herb appears to have become one of the casualties of the modern process of Chinese medicine standardization, in which all references to the profession’s shamanic past have been systematically purged from the face of TCM by the Chinese government. In addition, the plant grows only in the wild and is therefore extremely hard to find on Chinese herb markets.

The modern resurgence of deep seated recalcitrant infections affecting the nervous system, such as Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and other mystery syndromes has sent researchers into the rain forests of the world in search for potential cures. The renaissance of this herb is the result of a decade-long research project that first identified a range of “anti-Gu” substances in the classic materia medica, and then determined through clinical usage which one of these are appropriate and safe to use in a modern clinical context. In this process, Guijianyu was identified as one of the best broad-spectrum anti-toxin herbs with an anti-pathogenic function that can be compared to Qinghao.

A local wild-crafter in North Sichuan displaying the abundance of guijianyu.Classical Pearls sources its Guijianyu in the pristine wilderness separating the provinces of Shaanxi and Sichuan. Local wild-crafters hike deep into the mountains before they are able to find isolated patches of the Burning Bush plant. Decoction of the “winged” twigs yields a potent extract with distinct aroma.
Unprocessed; naturally dried